Web dating sex game

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Yes, according to psychologists at Chicago University who last week reported that marriages that begin online – whether on an online dating site or via social networking sites like Facebook – stood a greater chance of success than those that began in the “real world”.

The researchers interviewed 20,000 people who had married between 20.

Professor John Cacioppo, who led the study, said the sheer number of available potential partners online could be among the reasons for the results.

There was also the fact that dating sites were more likely “attract people who are serious about getting married.” Paula Hall, a counsellor for Relate, agrees that the main advantage of online dating is that “couples are more likely to be on a level playing field and share the same agenda.

But since 1995 when the first online dating site was launched, the tables have completely turned.

I’d always been attracted to mavericks, handsome men, who – after a year or so – made it clear they had no intention of settling down.

Just over a third had met their spouse online – and their marriages were 25 per cent more likely to last than those of couples who’d met via traditional routes – in a bar, at work, or via family and friends.

Moreover, couples who’d first met face-to-face reported slightly less satisfaction with their relationships than their online counterparts.

Academics, meanwhile, are fascinated by the data being gathered — and largely kept secret — by the dating industry.

“We’d love to get hold of more of it, but they’re not keen to share though we’re in discussion with a few of them,” says Robin Dunbar, professor of evolutionary psychology at Oxford University and author of The Science of Love and Betrayal.

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